Pelvic Vein Embolisation

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Pelvic vein embolisation
(Ref: www.radiologyinfo.org)
Pelvic Vein Embolisation.pdf
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Pelvic vein embolisation is a procedure used to treat varicosities within the pelvis. It may be required prior to treating varicose veins within the leg to prevent the problem within the legs recurring. 

There are two groups of patients who might require a pelvic vein embolisation. The first are women who have varicose veins in their legs that are developing because of incompetence in the pelvic venous system. This would be detected when the patient has their vascular ultrasound assesment prior to any varicose vein procedure. In this case they would need their pelvic venous incompetence treated prior to the varicose veins in their legs to stop the problem recurring. The second group of patients who may require pelvic vein embolisation are women who have pelvic congestion syndrome. This is the presence of varicose veins within the pelvis causing symptoms of chronic pelvic pain, abnormal menstrual bleeding, irritable bladder, vaginal discharge or varicose veins on the buttocks, vulva or thigh.

If you require a pelvic vein embolisation you wlll be referred to one of our specialised vascular radiologists. Under X-ray guidance they will insert a small catheter - a narrow tube about the size of a strand of spaghetti - into the femoral vein in the groin and direct it towards the problematic vein or veins within the pelvis. Once in position they will insert tiny coils and a sclerosing agent (a drug also used to treat varicose veins within the legs) into the problem vein in order to seal and close it.

The actual procedure will take around an hour however you will have to come into hospital on a daycase basis. This means that you will arrive a couple of hours before your procedure to be admitted onto a ward and prepare for the procedure and you will be taken back to the ward following the procedure. As soon as you have recovered from the embolisation you will be allowed to go home. This is usually about four hours after the procedure has finished. 

 

No, any pain caused by the procedure will have been managed by your consultant. Prior to the embolisation the area will be numbed with a local anaesthetic and in most cases sedation and analgesics can also be given to make the patient more comfortable. 
 
Following the procedure you may experience some pelvic discomfort for one to two days. This is normal and can be managed with pain killers. 

 

Most women recover immediately from the procedure and are back to their normal activities the following day. However some may find that they require a couple of days off work in order to recover. There are no limitations as to what you can do following the procedure. 

Most women recover immediately from the procedure and are back to their normal activities the following day. However some may find that they require a couple of days off work in order to recover. There are no limitations as to what you can do following the procedure. 

 

Those patients who require varicose vein treatment of their legs following the procedure can have this done as soon as the next day although some women may want to leave at least a week between treatments to recover fully and minimise any post-procedural discomfort.  

How to contact us

Professor M Baguneid

Consultant Vascular Surgeon

Email: admin@vascularsurgery.org.uk

Web: www.vascularsurgery.org.uk

 

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